What is a Nurse Practitioner?

Nurse  practitioners  are  licensed  jointly  by  the  Boards  of  Nursing  and  Medicine. Almost  7,700  licensed  nurse  practitioners  provide  primary  and  specialized  health  care to  Virginians.

 

Nurse  practitioners  are  master’s or doctoral prepared  Registered  Nurses  who,  through advanced  education  and clinical  experience,  provide  a  wide  range  of  preventive  and acute  health  care  services  to  individuals  of  all  ages.

 

Nurse  practitioners  are  required  to  pass  a  national  certifying board  exam  and  maintain  board  certification which  requires  continuing  education  and  renewal  on  a  3-­5  year  basis.

 

Nurse  practitioners  are  trained  to  provide  primary  and  acute  care  for  the  entire  family  and  deliver  this  service in  private  offices,  community  health  care  centers,  and  free  clinics  throughout  the  Commonwealth.

 

The  Virginia  Board  of  Nursing  recognizes  the  following  categories  of  nurse  practitioners:  Adult,  Family, Pediatrics,  Geriatrics,  Neonatal,  Women’s  Health,  Acute  Care,  and  Psychiatric.

 

Today,  many  nurse  practitioners  work  in  specialty  practices  including,  but  not  limited  to:  Cardiology, Oncology,  Gastroenterology,  Urology,  Nephrology,  Dermatology,  Interventional  Radiology,  Pain  Management, Trauma,  Critical  Care,  Surgery,  Pulmonary,  Rheumatology,  Endocrinology,  Women’s  Health  and  Internal Medicine.

 

Nurse  practitioners  complete  health  histories  and  provide  comprehensive physical examinations, diagnose and treat  many  common  acute  and  chronic  problems,  interpret  laboratory  results  and  imaging  studies,  prescribe  and manage  medications  and  other  therapies,  provide  health  teaching  and  supportive  counseling  with  an  emphasis on  prevention  of  illness  and  health  maintenance,  and  refer  patients  to  other  health  professionals  as  needed.

 

Nurse  practitioners  practice  in  private/community  practice;  in  hospitals  and  academic  centers;  community health  centers;  long-term  care;  in  Veterans  Administration  and  military  hospitals;  free  clinics;  convenient  care clinics;  and  clinics  in  urban,  suburban,  rural  settings  and  in  underserved  areas.